Monthly Archives: March 2009

Molecular gastronomy


Molecular gastronomy is a scientific discipline involving the study of physical and chemical processes that occur in cooking. It pertains to the mechanisms behind the transformation of ingredients in cooking and the social, artistic and technical components of culinary and gastronomic phenomena in general (from a scientific point of view).

There are many branches of food science, all of which study different aspects of food such as safety, microbiology, preservation, chemistry, engineering, physics and the like. Though until the advent of molecular gastronomy, there was no formal scientific discipline dedicated to studying the processes in regular cooking as done in the home or in a restaurant. The aforementioned (perhaps with the exception of food safety) have mostly been concerned with industrial food production and while the disciplines may overlap with each other to varying degrees, they are considered separate areas of investigation.

Though many disparate examples of the scientific investigation of cooking exist throughout history, the creation of the discipline of molecular gastronomy was intended to bring together what had previously been fragmented and isolated investigation into the chemical and physical processes of cooking into an organized discipline within food science to address what the other disciplines within food science either do not cover, or cover in a manner intended for scientists rather than cooks.

Wikipedia

Erik Satie – Gnossiennes


Éric Alfred Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 – Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a “gymnopedist” in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a “phonometrograph” or “phonometrician” (meaning “someone who measures (and writes down) sounds”) preferring this designation to that of “musician,” after having been called “a clumsy but subtle technician” in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music, and the Theatre of the Absurd.

Satie as precursor: the only “precursor” discussion Satie was involved in during his lifetime was whether or not he was a precursor of Claude Debussy, but many would follow. Over the years Satie would be described as a precursor of movements and styles as varied as Impressionism, neo-classicism, Dada, Surrealism, atonalism, minimalism, conceptual art, the Theatre of the Absurd, muzak, ambient music, multimedia art, etc., and as taking the first steps towards techniques such as prepared piano and music-to-film synchronisation. Further, Satie became one of the first musicians to perform a cameo appearance — he was in a 1924 film by René Clair (see: a sample of the film (rm format) and the Entr’acte article).

All by himself Satie appears to have been the precursor to half of the avant-garde movements of the 20th century. Many of these “precursorisms” are possibly based on quite superficial resemblances only, while, on the other hand, he undeniably inspired and influenced many later artists, and their ideas. According to Milhaud, Satie had “prophesied the major movements in classical music to appear over the next fifty years within his own body of work.”
– From Wikipedia

Tagged

Hot Diggity Dog!


Top Dog is nothing too fancy but if you’re looking for a good hot dog that’s easy on the pocket book, then you have chosen the right place. Not only do they have tasty Top dogs but they also have variety of different sausages and links. One of my favorites is the Lemon Chicken Sausage.

All dogs, sausages and links come on toasted buns plain leaving you to decide whether you want their tasty chili or of course your basic hot dog toppings which consist of specialty mustard, sauerkraut, ketchup, sweet pickle relish and fresh onion! If the dogs aren’t enough to fill you up, then there are bags of chips, and to wash it all down there’s a small variety of fountain drinks. So if you’re ever in Berkeley and are craving a good hot dog, sausage or link I would recommend Top Dog, which is located @ 2534 Durant Ave. I recommend this spot because of taste/Price/Location..It’s really close to the U.C campus and Telegraph in which there’s plenty to see and do!

SMR 22!

Tagged

the end of the parkway theater….


parkway
by Ron Chan

Message from the parkway theater…

“After more than twelve years of serving the great cultural crossroad of Oakland, the Parkway Speakeasy Theater will be closing at the end of business day, Sunday March 22, 2009.

From African Diaspora to Thrillville to lesbian fashion shows and educational porn, the Parkway has offered an eclectic array of movies and events. It was the first theater in California to offer food, beer and wine service in a lounge style movie theater. With a nudge or a push from the community, there was little programming the Parkway theater would not try in order to better be a community center and a safe haven for diverse ideas. The Parkway brought Baby Brigade for the shuttered and abandoned parents of newborns, the first international black gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, transgender film festival and Sunday Salon, a free event for cultural and community enhancement. We, at the Parkway Speakeasy Theater, are deeply proud of the Parkway and will profoundly miss serving its community. Thank you for your patronage”

RIP

dirty projectors..review sxsw 2009


NPR.org, March 19, 2009 – It’s telling that The Dirty Projectors’ MySpace page credits Dave Longstreth with “musical direction.” What began as a vehicle for the eccentric songwriter gradually turned into a place to execute his vision of a cut-up world. He deconstructs his own music and others’ — most recently, that of Black Flag — and reassembles it with his distinct guitar work and intricate vocal arrangements, with help from Amber Coffman and Angel Deradoorian.

The band recently collaborated with David Byrne on a track for the Dark Was the Night compilation, crafting a song that wouldn’t have sounded out of place on Talking Heads’ album Little Creatures. But for fans, the big highlight of The Dirty Projectors’ SXSW appearances will be the chance to hear new material from Bitte Orca, due June 9. The band recently added two more touring members — bassist Nat Baldwin and vocalist Haley Dekle — adding to the crazy quilt of sounds. Hear The Dirty Projectors recorded live in concert from The Parish in Austin, Texas

Go here to listen to the performance::
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=101414066

The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction By Walter Benjamin


In principle a work of art has always been reproducible. Man-made artifacts could always be imitated by men. Replicas were made by pupils in practice of their craft, by masters for diffusing their works, and, finally, by third parties in the pursuit of gain. Mechanical reproduction of a work of art, however, represents something new. Historically, it advanced intermittently and in leaps at long intervals, but with accelerated intensity. The Greeks knew only two procedures of technically reproducing works of art: founding and stamping. Bronzes, terra cottas, and coins were the only art works which they could produce in quantity. All others were unique and could not be mechanically reproduced. With the woodcut graphic art became mechanically reproducible for the first time, long before script became reproducible by print. The enormous changes which printing, the mechanical reproduction of writing, has brought about in literature are a familiar story. However, within the phenomenon which we are here examining from the perspective of world history, print is merely a special, though particularly important, case. During the Middle Ages engraving and etching were added to the woodcut; at the beginning of the nineteenth century lithography made its appearance. With lithography the technique of reproduction reached an essentially new stage. This much more direct process was distinguished by the tracing of the design on a stone rather than its incision on a block of wood or its etching on a copperplate and permitted graphic art for the first time to put its products on the market, not only in large numbers as hitherto, but also in daily changing forms. Lithography enabled graphic art to illustrate everyday life, and it began to keep pace with printing. But only a few decades after its invention, lithography was surpassed by photography. For the first time in the process of pictorial reproduction, photography freed the hand of the most important artistic functions which henceforth devolved only upon the eye looking into a lens. Since the eye perceives more swiftly than the hand can draw, the process of pictorial reproduction was accelerated so enormously that it could keep pace with speech. A film operator shooting a scene in the studio captures the images at the speed of an actor’s speech. Just as lithography virtually implied the illustrated newspaper, so did photography foreshadow the sound film. The technical reproduction of sound was tackled at the end of the last century. These convergent endeavors made predictable a situation which Paul Valery pointed up in this sentence:

“Just as water, gas, and electricity are brought into our houses from far off to satisfy our needs in response to a minimal effort, so we shall be supplied with visual or auditory images, which will appear and disappear at a simple movement of the hand, hardly more than a sign.”

Around 1900 technical reproduction had reached a standard that not only permitted it to reproduce all transmitted works of art and thus to cause the most profound change in their impact upon the public; it also had captured a place of its own among the artistic processes. For the study of this standard nothing is more revealing than the nature of the repercussions that these two different manifestations – the reproduction of works of art and the art of the film – have had on art in its traditional form.
II

Even the most perfect reproduction of a work of art is lacking in one element: its presence in time and space, its unique existence at the place where it happens to be. This unique existence of the work of art determined the history to which it was subject throughout the time of its existence. This includes the changes which it may have suffered in physical condition over the years as well as the various changes in its ownership. The traces of the first can be revealed only by chemical or physical analyses which it is impossible to perform on a reproduction; changes of ownership are subject to a tradition which must be traced from the situation of the original.

The presence of the original is the prerequisite to the concept of authenticity. Chemical analyses of the patina of a bronze can help to establish this, as does the proof that a given manuscript of the Middle Ages stems from an archive of the fifteenth century. The whole sphere of authenticity is outside technical – and, of course, not only technical – reproducibility. Confronted with its manual reproduction, which was usually branded as a forgery, the original preserved all its authority; not so vis-à-vis technical reproduction. The reason is twofold. First, process reproduction is more independent of the original than manual reproduction. For example, in photography, process reproduction can bring out those aspects of the original that are unattainable to the naked eye yet accessible to the lens, which is adjustable and chooses its angle at will. And photographic reproduction, with the aid of certain processes, such as enlargement or slow motion, can capture images which escape natural vision. Secondly, technical reproduction can put the copy of the original into situations which would be out of reach for the original itself. Above all, it enables the original to meet the beholder halfway, be it in the form of a photograph or a phonograph record. The cathedral leaves its locale to be received in the studio of a lover of art; the choral production, performed in an auditorium or in the open air, resounds in the drawing room.

The situations into which the product of mechanical reproduction can be brought may not touch the actual work of art, yet the quality of its presence is always depreciated. This holds not only for the art work but also, for instance, for a landscape which passes in review before the spectator in a movie. In the case of the art object, a most sensitive nucleus – namely, its authenticity – is interfered with whereas no natural object is vulnerable on that score. The authenticity of a thing is the essence of all that is transmissible from its beginning, ranging from its substantive duration to its testimony to the history which it has experienced. Since the historical testimony rests on the authenticity, the former, too, is jeopardized by reproduction when substantive duration ceases to matter. And what is really jeopardized when the historical testimony is affected is the authority of the object.

One might subsume the eliminated element in the term “aura” and go on to say: that which withers in the age of mechanical reproduction is the aura of the work of art. This is a symptomatic process whose significance points beyond the realm of art. One might generalize by saying: the technique of reproduction detaches the reproduced object from the domain of tradition. By making many reproductions it substitutes a plurality of copies for a unique existence. And in permitting the reproduction to meet the beholder or listener in his own particular situation, it reactivates the object reproduced. These two processes lead to a tremendous shattering of tradition which is the obverse of the contemporary crisis and renewal of mankind. Both processes are intimately connected with the contemporary mass movements. Their most powerful agent is the film. Its social significance, particularly in its most positive form, is inconceivable without its destructive, cathartic aspect, that is, the liquidation of the traditional value of the cultural heritage. This phenomenon is most palpable in the great historical films. It extends to ever new positions. In 1927 Abel Gance exclaimed enthusiastically:

“Shakespeare, Rembrandt, Beethoven will make films… all legends, all mythologies and all myths, all founders of religion, and the very religions… await their exposed resurrection, and the heroes crowd each other at the gate.”

Presumably without intending it, he issued an invitation to a far-reaching liquidation.
III

During long periods of history, the mode of human sense perception changes with humanity’s entire mode of existence. The manner in which human sense perception is organized, the medium in which it is accomplished, is determined not only by nature but by historical circumstances as well. The fifth century, with its great shifts of population, saw the birth of the late Roman art industry and the Vienna Genesis, and there developed not only an art different from that of antiquity but also a new kind of perception. The scholars of the Viennese school, Riegl and Wickhoff, who resisted the weight of classical tradition under which these later art forms had been buried, were the first to draw conclusions from them concerning the organization of perception at the time. However far-reaching their insight, these scholars limited themselves to showing the significant, formal hallmark which characterized perception in late Roman times. They did not attempt – and, perhaps, saw no way – to show the social transformations expressed by these changes of perception. The conditions for an analogous insight are more favorable in the present. And if changes in the medium of contemporary perception can be comprehended as decay of the aura, it is possible to show its social causes.

The concept of aura which was proposed above with reference to historical objects may usefully be illustrated with reference to the aura of natural ones. We define the aura of the latter as the unique phenomenon of a distance, however close it may be. If, while resting on a summer afternoon, you follow with your eyes a mountain range on the horizon or a branch which casts its shadow over you, you experience the aura of those mountains, of that branch. This image makes it easy to comprehend the social bases of the contemporary decay of the aura. It rests on two circumstances, both of which are related to the increasing significance of the masses in contemporary life. Namely, the desire of contemporary masses to bring things “closer” spatially and humanly, which is just as ardent as their bent toward overcoming the uniqueness of every reality by accepting its reproduction. Every day the urge grows stronger to get hold of an object at very close range by way of its likeness, its reproduction. Unmistakably, reproduction as offered by picture magazines and newsreels differs from the image seen by the unarmed eye. Uniqueness and permanence are as closely linked in the latter as are transitoriness and reproducibility in the former. To pry an object from its shell, to destroy its aura, is the mark of a perception whose “sense of the universal equality of things” has increased to such a degree that it extracts it even from a unique object by means of reproduction. Thus is manifested in the field of perception what in the theoretical sphere is noticeable in the increasing importance of statistics. The adjustment of reality to the masses and of the masses to reality is a process of unlimited scope, as much for thinking as for perception.

Samthrax


Check out my friend Sam @
http://www.myspace.com/garbagefacekillah

and the Gallery Section for more from Samtrax.

Tagged

Doom- born like this


“Born like this/ Into this/ As the chalk faces smile/ As Mrs Death laughs/ As the elevators break/ As political landscapes dissolve.” The first album from Daniel Dumile’s latest pseudonym takes its name from Charles Bukowski’s poem Dinosauria, We, whose opening lines are sampled here on the B-movie apocalypse of Cellz. The late writer’s tale of “hospitals which are so expensive it’s cheaper to die… a country where the jails are full and the madhouses closed” functions both as a prophesy of doom and a shadow biography of DOOM.

Dumile first appeared in 1990 as Zev Love X, the driving force of New York hip-hoppers KMD. In 1993 he lost both his partner/brother Subroc to a car accident and his Elektra record contract to a row over the artwork of KMD’s second album, Bl_ck B_st_rds (Dumile refused to compromise on its cover of a Sambo figure on the gallows). He abandoned music and sank into a depression that saw him sleeping rough in Manhattan. When he re-emerged in 1998, it was as MF Doom, masked supercriminal and man of many further aliases, including Metal Fingers.

Dumile hasn’t shown his real face in public since, performing behind his mask, and even conducting interviews in character. His insistence on keeping out of the limelight couldn’t be more at odds with the swaggering ego of hip-hop tradition. Is this a screen for the pain that lingers from his KMD days? Or camouflage for the mundane reality that behind this most brilliant of writers lurks a reclusive pot-bellied father of three who loves beer and comic books?

The world of Marvel remains his inspiration: his name, now shortened to DOOM (“all big letters but it isn’t no acronym,” he declares on the 91-second single, Ballskin), is adapted from Stan Lee’s Dr Doom, his records are littered with superhero and monster movie samples and Born Like This contains a rumination on the homoerotic history of the Caped Crusader and his Boy Wonder, the unfortunately titled Batty Boyz. DOOM revels in being the outsider, the freak reviled by society, the supervillain who is not all bad. His twist on hip-hop archetypes, casting himself as a rapping Phantom of the Opera returning to wreak revenge on those who wronged him, is given added spice by his own history.

Although Born Like This is his first album in four years, little has changed. “Same guy, same disguise, sick aim, eye stare,” as he says on Rap Ambush, a journey into the heart of a metaphorical insurgent hurling RPGs (“rhyme-propelled grenades”). He still likes to make life difficult. Choruses are a long-standing no-go, tracks veer off at right angles or skid abruptly to a halt. Guests Raekwon and Ghostface are chosen not for their pulling power, but their knack for submerging identity beneath an assumed character. Production duties are mostly split between DOOM and Jake One, fashioning a sound ripe with piercing organs and violins pitched around the point where Frankenstein’s monster hauls himself out of his surgical straps.

After a period of workaholism that threatened overkill, followed by a period of hibernation, Born Like This finds DOOM back to his scalpel-tongued, scatter-mouthed best. KMD couldn’t have ended worse; Daniel Dumile’s renaissance could scarcely have gone better. As the closing lines of Dinosauria, We have it: “Born out of that/ The sun still hidden there/ Awaiting the next chapter.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2009/mar/15/doom-born-like-this-review

Download:
http://www.mediafire.com/?kzzyiynmt3w